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Closure Math & Science class 2016-2016

After a thorough selection, 25 motivated high school students were selected to join the Math&Science class 2016-2017. A joint collaboration with Betasteunpunt Zuid Holland and the Technical University Delft. The Math & Science class challenges pupils to solve math problems in a non traditional way, to think out of the box. But also do the pupils get acquainted with several aspects of the scientific research that is done at the TU Delft. For example they had lectures from Dr. Arno Smets on solar energy and they visited the cleanroom at the Else Kooi lab. The last 10 weeks they designed and made a solar boot, implementing the knowledge they gathered during weeks they had their science lectures. On Friday June 2, the solar boots will be tested and the students will receive their certificate during a festive closure event at the Campus. In the water before the Industrial design fault, 5 teams will have a race with their boots., their school teacher, parents and the TUD lecturers as an audience. After the race, the pupils will present the journal they worked on, and receive their certificate.


Master thesis defence Yalin Gürcan

The problem of estimation of these three parameters of scatterers in an area can then be simplified as a problem of spectral estimation over three separate domains. The recent algorithms for solving such a problem in the context of array based radar applications range from adaptive, nonparametric methods, subspace based parametric methods and sparse recovery methods. However, these methods mostly ignore the inter- and intra- pulse Doppler effects of multiple moving targets. Furthermore, with demand for more resolution, investigation of wideband effects on range-azimuth-Doppler estimation is necessary. In this thesis, we firstly develop a MATLAB based MIMO radar simulator, on which the theoretical models are to be tested. The first aim of the thesis is to investigate the joint range-azimuth estimation methods and the shortcomings of narrowband assumptions, especially on the DoA estimation problem. We propose a novel signal model specifically for LFMCW radar systems and two methods of joint estimation using this model. The next aim is to investigate the effects of the movement of the targets on accuracy of the estimation problem. We study these effects firstly on the range-azimuth estimation problem and provide a more detailed signal model, which, theoretically also allows for the joint estimation of range, azimuth and velocity parameters using only a single chirp. Then we look into joint estimation in three domains and provide a subspace based algorithm, using the proposed signal model, capable of solving this problem. The accuracy of the new signal model and performance of the estimation algorithm is then tested on data generated by the MATLAB based simulator. Comparisons are made with respect to state of the art, MUSIC based joint estimation algorithm and theoretical bounds. Furthermore, range-Doppler estimation is performed on real life data, taken from the Dolphin prototype NXP automotive radar system. Future works based on this model is proposed.


PhD defence Inna Ivashko

SUMMARY The ultimate goal of any sensing system is to build situation awareness. Existing solutions for a single radar node that have to assure extended areas of coverage with high resolution measurements (in range, cross-range, and Doppler) are physically cumbersome (large antenna size) and typically require large operational resources (high transmit power, wide bandwidth and long integration time).Combining data from multiple spatially separated nodes located at several locations offers a possibility to use radars with low-cost omnidirectional antennas to cover wide areas and overcome operational limitations such as sector blockage due to landscape or high-rise buildings. Thus, performance of the complete system becomes dependent not only on the parameters of a single radar node, but on the number of nodes and their location (system topology) as well. A proper selection of both node-related (transmit power, operational frequency and bandwidth, integration time, etc.) and system-related (node location, node cooperation) resources is an important design task, which forms the major focus of this thesis. The first part of this dissertation is dedicated to the development of the radar network performance assessment tool,while the second part provides the framework for radar network topology optimization. The potential accuracy of the target parameters estimation has been used for radar network performance assessment. The developed tool incorporates parameters of a single radar node as well as system parameters (positions of the nodes and their cooperation), evaluated using Cramér-Rao lower bound. Using the tools developed, performance of different types of radar networks have been studied and compared in this thesis. For the radar network topology optimization several convex and greedy algorithms have been used, making the optimization approach versatile. Validation and performance comparison of the optimization algorithms have been performed in this thesis. The results obtained in this research can be used to evaluate the potential performance of radar networks for different applications and provide a solution to key problems of their topology design.


Kick off Math & Science class 2016-2017

Start of a new Math &Science class for highschool students. The students will have math and science classes for 22 weeks at the TU Delft


Vacancy: Team manager for Electrical Engineering Education (EEE)

The Faculty of EEMCS is creating a special team to fully focus on teaching using our unique and innovative ‘Delft method’. This method integrates practical and theoretical electrical engineering education and trains students to be hands-on, theoretically versed electrical engineers ready for a future career in science or industry.

We are looking for a team manager specialising in Electrical Engineering Education (EEE) who will be both a group leader and a teacher in his/her capacity as the role model of EE Education.

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7 July 2016: Opening of CryoLab for Extremely Sensitive Electronic Measurements

The CryoLab of TU Delft's Faculty of EEMCS has been opened on Thursday 7 July by the dean Rob Fastenau. TU Delft scientists from the Tera-Hertz Sensing Group, Jochem Baselmans and Akira Endo, will be leading a team of young scientists and engineers working in the lab on astronomical instrumentation. The first instrument, DESHIMA (Delft SRON High-redshift Mapper), is being developed to be operated on the ASTE telescope in the Atacama Desert in Chile. The goal of the research is to create 3D charts of so-called submillimetre galaxies that, in contrast to 2D charts, also show distance and time.

The large number of superconducting detectors, and the advanced electronics developed at SRON, allows DESHIMA to map a very large volume of space at once. While Endo leads the development of DESHIMA, Baselmans will soon install the next cryostat for testing novel THz array antennas, that will enable his upcoming instrument MOSAIC to target multiple galaxies at once. In the future, the CryoLab is envisioned to also host new coolers from QuTech. Superconducting electronics used for astronomical instrumentation and quantum electronics have much in common, because they both push the limits of what can be observed.


Closing Math & Science Class

Students from year 5 of pre-university education have spent 22 weeks attending maths and science lectures on the TU Delft campus. The Math & Science Class 2015-2016 has reached a festive closing on Friday 20 May with a solar-powered boat race in the pool in front of the Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering. The 25 participating students, from 12 different secondary schools in the Netherlands, received their certificate from Anka Mulder.

The purpose of the Math & Science Class is to ease the transition from secondary school to university, to increase the participants' problem-solving abilities and to develop their independent research skills. It also introduces the students to the top-class research carried out at TU Delft, through lectures by leading professors such as Arno Smets, Lieven Vandersypen and Ulf Haneveld. During the last weeks of the programme the students have been working in groups to design and build a solar-powered boat.


Cum Laude for MS3 masterstudent Joris Derksen

A short description of his topic Radars are vital systems for the navy as they are the primary systems for the detection, tracking and sometimes classification of friendly and hostile targets. It is therefore important that navies can assess the radars performance under the prevailing conditions. The atmosphere can significantly alter the radars performance from standard. Nowadays computer models can fairly accurately predict radar performance if sufficient atmospheric input data is available. While many studies are dedicated to accurately model radar performance, little has yet been done to define how accurate and how high in resolution atmospheric data must be to suffice as input for accurate radar performance prediction. My study takes preliminary steps into finding horizontal and temporal resolution requirements for different weather conditions. The study I will present will be particular of interest to the Royal Netherlands Navy as they currently predict radar performance with a single vertical profile and thereby assume that the atmosphere is horizontally homogenous. My thesis clearly shows that using a single profile can result in erroneous radar performance predictions. In these cases 3D dimensional data is required, which, for example, numerical weather prediction models can obtain.


Annual poster event

On January 28 2016, our group had its annual poster event . Both postdocs and PhD students presented their research with a poster and a one minute pitch. A jury, consisting of Willem Hol(Thales) Wim van Rossum (TNO ) and Leo de Vreede (TU Delft) decided on the best poster and presentation. Albert Oude Nijhuis was selected as the winner with his poster on Assessment of the rain drop inertia effect for radar based turbulence intensity retrievals . The public awards were given to Jianping Wang (Rotating Array Design for Short Range Full-Polarimetric Imaging) and Nikita Petrov (Wideband Unambiguous Radar Target Detection)


Happy 2016!

Here are some pictures of the New Year Reception of the Microelectronics department

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PhD defence D. Penkin

Recently, the concept of a nanonetwork has attracted large attention of researchers as it potentially offers low-cost solutions for a wide spectrum of current applications and enables numerous emerging ones. At present, however, all the sensor networks consist of a relatively small number of macroscale devices with their positions carefully pre-determined. The typical nanonetwork, on the contrary, can be envisioned as a swarm of nanomachines that are distributed in a random manner, which also can reach covered places, accomplish sensing directly inside a phenomenon or equip an application with enhanced control capabilities. To operate and monitor within a macroscale application area, information sharing between nanonetwork entities is required (likewise data transfer among human cells). Electromagnetic waves at microwave frequencies can potentially enable wireless communication between nanomachines even in vicious and hazardous environments. However, the paradigms of traditional microwave communication must undergo a substantial revision before being applied to nanotechnology: due to space restrictions, nanomachines have very strong power limitations and should be capable to operate on an extremely tight energy budget. This places a very strong restriction on the communication link power budget. Moreover, networking-level techniques capable of describing a connectivity and signal propagation in the 'topology-less' nanonetwork are currently missing. These two open issues served as primary motivating factors for this doctoral dissertation, which broadly focuses on the feasibility and development of electromagnetic-based communications for nanonetworks. Prof.dr. O. Yarovoy (EWI); copromotor: Dr.ir. G.J.M. Janssen (UHD-EWI)

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Best paper award IET radar conference 2015, China

Shilong Sun has developed an inversion scheme for through the wall imaging of objects, based on a contrast source inversion technique in combination with a finite difference frequency domain technique. By combining both TE-polarized as well as TM-polarized waves in a frequency hopping scheme, the method provides a good reconstruction of the shape and the material properties of the objects behind the wall. This paper is a result of joint research activity between MS3 group with the National University of Defence Technology in China. One of the co-authors, Dr. Tian Jin from NUDT, stayed in the MS3 group within 2014-2015 as a guest researcher.

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TU Delft Female Fellowship Tenure Track Openings

Academic openings at all professor levels

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Lecture Xiaodong Xhuge

This lecture will introduce the basic concept of tomography and analytical reconstruction method commonly applied in practice. After a short introduction to tomography and its applications in science and industry. We will then go through some basic mathematical concepts including the Radon Transform and Projection Slice theorem. Then we will introduce the filtered back projection method which is one of the most commonly used techniques in practice. In the end, we will take a brief look at more advanced methods and talk about their potential benefits to applications.


Kick off Math&Science class 2015-2016

For 23 weeks the pupils from highschools all over the Netherlands will get math lectures and science lectures on the TU Delft Campus.


Master thesis defence Rossiza Gourova

On September 23 Rossiza Gourova succesfully defended her master thesis. Rossiza now joined our group as a PhD on automotive.

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Closure event Math & Science class

The Math & Science class is an initiative of prof Alexander Yarovoy and prof Yaroslav Blanter. They saw the gap, escpecially on mathematics , between highscools and the university. With the Math & Science class they want to prepare the pupils for the level requested at the university and also show the different aspects of science research.


Defense Nadia Haider, April 23, Aula Senaatszaal at 12.30

Sensors such as phased array radars play a crucial role in public safety. They are unavoidable for surveillance, threat identification and post-disaster management. However, different scenarios impose immensely diverse requirements for these systems. Phased array systems occupy a large space. In addition, if different antenna systems are needed for each function, the space required can be considerably large. For transportable platforms, such as ships and aircrafts, space and weight are at a premium. Therefore, reconfigurable multi-band antennas are very attractive solutions for future multi-function sensor systems. Within this research work three different approaches are investigated to realize antennas for reconfigurable phased arrays. Wideband antenna designs constitute the first approach. Integrating this type of antennas with frequency selective filters provide the opportunity for fine tuning within one radar band. The wideband operation of the antenna is achieved by the blind-via feeding section and the quasi electric-magnetic radiating structure. The second approach involves the design of an antenna element with p-I-n diode switches. The switches are used to alter the antenna structure and thereby the operating frequency. Measured results verified the frequency reconfigurable capability of the antenna within L/S radar bands with frequency ratio more than 2:1. The planar structure, the back feeding mechanism, the compact size and the simple bias network made the proposed antenna suitable for array applications. The large frequency ratio and its usability in phased array applications made the design novel. Furthermore, for these frequency reconfigurable elements, a unique multi-scale array structure is introduced which can assure wide angle scanning for both frequency bands. The advantage of this novel array configuration is twofold: reduce the mutual couplings in the lower band, and increase the scanning volume for the higher band. A planar array demonstrator validated the proposed concept. In the third approach the operational band of an antenna is tuned by variableimpedance matching. In this study, the standard 50 Ω matching is avoided and many advantages of variable-impedance matching are demonstrated. First, the principle is verified by tuning the frequency band of a microstrip antenna by an input-impedance tuneable CMOS RF-frontend. In the second design a novel dual-band E-slot antenna, with 2.5:1 frequency ratio, was designed. By changing the input-impedance the operating frequency of the antenna can be switched from L- to S-band. Variableimpedance matching provides few other advantages to phased array antennas. A scan-angle dependent impedance matching will assure low reflection coefficients for the entire scanning volume. On the other hand, it will reduce interfering and jamming signals coming from adjacent angles. The outcomes of this research work have led to solid understanding of how we can realize frequency reconfigurable antennas for adaptive phased arrays. The results will be particularly valuable in developing future narrow or wide beam radar systems with frequency reconfiguration and angular filtering capabilities.


Article in Defensie magazine Materieelgezien

An article about the annual meeting of the Platform Nederland Radarland (NLRL), which was attended by the MS3 group, published in the Materieelgezien a magazine of the Dutch Ministry of Defence.

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Defence Fotios Katsilieris

Defence, March 5, 12.00 Aula, Senaatszaal. Sensor management for surveillance and tracking. An operational perspective. In the literature, several approaches to sensor (including radar) management can be found. These can be roughly grouped into: a) rule-based or heuristics; b) task-based; c) information-driven; and d) risk/threat-based. These approaches are compared in this dissertation and it is found that there is not a single approach that is both Bayes-optimal and takes into account explicitly the user requirements in different operational contexts. In order to overcome the challenges with the existing approaches, this dissertation proposes managing the uncertainty in higher-level quantities (as per the JDL model) that are directly of interest to an operator and directly related to the operational goal of a radar system. The proposed approach is motivated by the threat assessment process, which is an integral part of defence missions. Accordingly, a prominent example of a commonly used higher-level quantity is the threat-level of a target. The key advantage of the proposed approach is that it results in Bayes-optimal sensor control that also takes into account the operational context in a model-based manner. In other words: a) a radar operator can select the aspects of threat that are relevant to the operational context at hand; and b) external information about the arrival of targets and other scenario parameters can be included when defining the models used in the signal processing algorithms, leading to context-adaptive sensor management.


Defence T.H. de Groot, January 22

' Mission-driven Resource Managament for Reconfigurable Sensing Systems' . Promotor prof. A. Yarovoy, co-pomotor dr. O. Krasnov. Aula, Senaatszaal, 10.00


Alexander Yarovoy, Named 2015 IEEE Fellow

Prof. Alexander Yarovoy, DSc., from Delft University of Technology has been named an IEEE Fellow. He is being recognized for his work on ultra-wideband imaging for ground penetrating radar and microwave scanners.

The IEEE Grade of Fellow is conferred by the IEEE Board of Directors upon a person with an outstanding record of accomplishments in any of the IEEE fields of interest. The total number selected in any one year cannot exceed one-tenth of one- percent of the total voting membership. IEEE Fellow is the highest grade of membership and is recognized by the technical community as a prestigious honor and an important career achievement.


MP Jan Vos visits PARSAX

On Friday 7 November, Jan Vos, MP for the PvdA, visited the TU Delft Climate Institute. The theme of the visit was climate change, TU Delft's research and the usefulness of and need for climate monitoring. The programme included a demonstration of cloud simulations in the Virtual Lab and a visit to the PARSAX radar. Thanks to the rain, it was possible to obtain good live measurements.


First prize STARS Plenary Session

Yesterday Teun de Groot, the PhD student at Microwave Sensing, Signals and Systems section, won the 1st prize for his poster and presentation at the STARS Project's Plenary session 2014 in Enschede!

The title of his presentation was Mission-driven Resource Management for Reconfigurable Sensing Systems.

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Agenda

Chip Design Workshop

IEEE Solid-State Circuits Society

Program: 12:30 Coffee, 12:50 Welcome, Kofi Makinwa, TU Delft, 13:00 Introduction, Patrick Reyanert, KU Leuven, 13:15 – 13:40 A Dynamic Zoom ADC with 109 dB DR for Audio Applications, Burak Gönen, TU Delft, 13:40 – 14:00 A 0.3-2.6 TOPS/W Precision-Scalable Processor for Real-Time Large-Scale ConvNets - Bert Moons, KU Leuven, 14:20 – 14:45 Coffee Break, Talks by Benelux Chip Design Contest Winners: 14:0 – 14:20 A 94.6%-Efficiency Fully Integrated Switched-Capacitor DC-DC Converter in 40nm - Nicholas Butse, KU Leuven, Talks by Invited Speakers: 14:45 – 15:15 Design mistakes you’d rather not talk about, Klaas Bult 15:15 – 15:45 Cryo-CMOS for Quantum Computing, Fabio Sebastiano, TU Delft,


Seminar autonomous driving

Autonomous driving

Leo de Vreede, Alexander Yarovoy, Cicero Vaucher, Riender Happee, Dariu Gravila, Rossiza Gourova, Joris Domhof

Program 11.00 - 11.05 Opening (by Alexander Yarovoy and Leo de Vreede 11.05 - 11.35 S4-Drive project (PhD’s Rossiza Gourova (EEMCS) and Joris Domhof (3ME)) 11.35 - 12.05 Dariu Gavrila,‘Autonomous driving' 12.05 – 13.35 Riender Happee,‘Human Factor on autonomous driving’ Lunch break Lipkenszaal 13.00 - 13.30 Cicero Vaucher,‘Automotive radars’ 13.30 -14.00 CRUISE project proposal (Cicero Vaucher, Masoud Babaie and Faruk Uysal)


5G Multi-Beam Antenna Topologies

Yanki Aslan

5G Multi-Beam Antenna Topologies 5G communication systems are expected to achieve approximately 1000x communication capacity growth and less than 1ms latency in transferred data stream while supporting massive Internet of Things. To achieve the capacity and throughput requirements of 5G technology, a vast amount of spectrum with sufficient frequency re-use is necessary. Therefore, the concept of beam-division multiple access in millimeter-wave systems will be studied in this project. Transmissions in the millimeter-wave bands have significantly less favorable link budgets due to low power amplifier output powers, reduced receiving effective aperture and decreased diffraction and dispersion effects. To mitigate these drawbacks, large scale antenna arrays with tens or hundreds of elements are expected to be deployed in 5G systems. Using a transceiver behind every antenna element will consume unacceptable amounts of power and will likely be cost prohibitive. In fact, being high volume markets, 5G, or in general mobile communication, systems have strict cost requirements. Therefore, this research targets to satisfy the ambitious performance criteria of 5G by developing novel and advanced multi-beam antenna arrays integrated with low cost front-ends. In this seminar, I will talk about RF-oriented and hybrid (RF and baseband) beamforming approaches to design sparse and sub-array based antennas with wide scan multi-beam capability, low heat dissipation, high efficiency power amplifiers and low level of side lobes.

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Midterm presentation Ruoyu Feng

DOA Estimation Using MIMO-Monopulse for 79GHz Automotive FMCW Radar

Ruoyu Feng

Automotive radar is widely used for driving safety support and it is a key element of future autonomous vehicles. Radar sensors have the property that theperformance is not to be affected by low vision conditions compared with camera sensors or lazer radar sensors, which makes it critical for autonomous driving system. Automotive radar system utilizes millimeter-wave band to detect the range,Doppler velocity and direction of arrival(DOA). Commercial 24 GHz and 77GHz radar has been well developed in vehicle applications at present, and the future trendis 79 GHz solutionm with wider 4 GHz bandwidth, which has been defined by the European Commission in 2004 as the frequency allocation for automotive shortrange radar systems. The main modulation method of automotive radar is Frequency-ModulatedContinous-Wave(FMCW), which holds advantages including high resolution distance measurement,quick updating and good functions in the various weather condition. The resolution and accuracy with which the angle of arrival can be estimated depends on the number of used antennas and their physical size. To improve the performance advanced algorithms and antenna configurations can be used. So called super resolution techniques (such as Music and Esprit)can improve the estimation performance but suffer when few measurements are available. Moreover, these algorithm pose restriction on the configuration of the antenna array. Monopulse is an established technique for radars for precision angle estimation. Conventional monopulse with one transmitter and two receivers and phased ar-ray monopulse are well developed especially in tracking radar system. MIMO-monopulse has been studied in some literature, but most of them utilize dis-tributed MIMO. The research and application of colocated MIMO-monopulseare still potential.In this master thesis, we try to figure out the solution of anangle estimation algorithm using MIMO-monopulse based on an actual automo-tive radar from NXP which has 3 transmitters and 4 receivers MIMO antennas.


Seminar Nikita Petrov

Nikita Petrov

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Conferences

Eurosensors dead-line


Seminar Kishor Chandra

Kishor Chandra
Embedded software


Seminar Jianping Wang

Sampling Design for Linear Inversion Problems

Jianping Wang

How to properly take cost-efficient samples/sensing is a critical problem for linear inversion problems. For microwave imaging, it is manifested as properly taking advantage of space, frequency and polarization diversities of EM fields to get abundant observations for image formation. To fully exploit these diversities, we treat the microwave imaging as a linear inversion problem and formulate the sampling design as a sample selection problem. By analyzing the observation vectors in the sensing matrix, a greedy algorithm, named as Clustered Maximum Projection on Minimum Eigen-space (CMPME), is proposed to sequentially select the most informative observations by gradually expanding the observation space. Some numerical examples are shown to demonstrate the applications for non-regular ultra-wideband array design and three-dimensional array design with polarization diversities.

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Seminar Shilong Sun

Shilong Sun

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Seminar Sharef Neemat

Sharef Neemat

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Inverse Problems in Electromangetics

Challenges and New Frontiers

IEEE AP-Sdistinguished Professor Andrea lecturer: MASSA
University of Trento and Director Eledia Research Center

Inverse problems arise when formulating and addressing many synthesis and sensing applications in modern electromagnetic engineering. Indeed, the objective of antenna design, microwave imaging, and radar remote sensing can be seen as that of retrieving a physical quantity (the shape of the radiating system, the dielectric profile of a device under test, the reflectivity of an area) starting from (either measured or “desired”) electromagnetic field data. Nevertheless, the solution of the well‐known theoretical features (including ill‐posedness, non‐uniqueness, ill‐conditioning, etc.) of electromagnetic inverse problems still represents a major challenge from the practical viewpoint. Indeed, developing and implementing robust, fast, effective, and general‐purpose techniques able to solve arbitrary electromagnetic inverse problem still represent a holy grail from the academic and industrial viewpoint. Accordingly, several ad‐hoc solutions (i.e., effective only for specific application domains) have been developed in the recent years

In this framework, one of the most important research frontiers is the development of inversion techniques which enable the exploitation of both the information coming from the electromagnetic data and of that which is provided by prior knowledge of the scenario, application, or device of interest. Indeed, exploiting a‐priori information to regularize the problem formulation is known to be a key asset to reduce the drawbacks of inversion processes (i.e., the its ill‐posedness). However, properly introducing prior knowledge within an inversion technique is an extremely complex task, and suitable solutions are available only for specific classes of scenarios (e.g., comprising sparseness regularization terms).The aim of this talk is to provide a broad review of the current trends and objectives in the development of innovative inversion methodologies and algorithms. Towards this end, after a review of the literature on the topic, different classes of methodologies aimed at combining prior and acquired information (possibly in an iterative fashion) will be discussed, and guidelines on how to apply the arising strategies to different domains will be provided, along with numerical/experimental results. The open challenges and future trends of the research will be discussed as well

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MS3 seminar

Capabilities and Research Activities at the University of Oklahoma Advanced Radar Research Center

Prof. Nathan A. Goodman
The Advanced Radar Research Center (ARRC) at the University of Oklahoma

The Advanced Radar Research Center (ARRC) at the University of Oklahoma consists of a vibrant group of faculty and students from both engineering and meteorology, focused on solving challenging radar problems and preparing the next generation of students. Through the collaborative nature instilled in its members, the ARRC has proven effective at developing synergy between science and engineering in the field of radar. The ARRC resides in state-of-art Radar Innovations Laboratory, a one-of-a-kind and unrivalled facility for radar research, development, and education. This 35,000-sqft facility includes microwave labs, advanced fabrication capability, and two anechoic chambers.

Bio Prof. Goodman: Nathan A. Goodman received the B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Kansas, Lawrence, in 1995, 1997, and 2002, respectively. From 1996 to 1998, he was an RF systems engineer for Texas Instruments, Dallas, TX., and from 2002 to 2011, he was a faculty member in the ECE Department of the University of Arizona, Tucson. He is now a Professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Director of Research for the Advanced Radar Research Center at the University of Oklahoma, Norman.


MS3 seminar

MS3 Master Event

Come to learn about our group and current Master Thesis Projects...

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Master thesis defence Yalin Gürcan

Yalin Gürcan

The problem of estimation of these three parameters of scatterers in an area can then be simplified as a problem of spectral estimation over three separate domains. The recent algorithms for solving such a problem in the context of array based radar applications range from adaptive, nonparametric methods, subspace based parametric methods and sparse recovery methods. However, these methods mostly ignore the inter- and intra- pulse Doppler effects of multiple moving targets. Furthermore, with demand for more resolution, investigation of wideband effects on range-azimuth-Doppler estimation is necessary. In this thesis, we firstly develop a MATLAB based MIMO radar simulator, on which the theoretical models are to be tested. The first aim of the thesis is to investigate the joint range-azimuth estimation methods and the shortcomings of narrowband assumptions, especially on the DoA estimation problem. We propose a novel signal model specifically for LFMCW radar systems and two methods of joint estimation using this model. The next aim is to investigate the effects of the movement of the targets on accuracy of the estimation problem. We study these effects firstly on the range-azimuth estimation problem and provide a more detailed signal model, which, theoretically also allows for the joint estimation of range, azimuth and velocity parameters using only a single chirp. Then we look into joint estimation in three domains and provide a subspace based algorithm, using the proposed signal model, capable of solving this problem. The accuracy of the new signal model and performance of the estimation algorithm is then tested on data generated by the MATLAB based simulator. Comparisons are made with respect to state of the art, MUSIC based joint estimation algorithm and theoretical bounds. Furthermore, range-Doppler estimation is performed on real life data, taken from the Dolphin prototype NXP automotive radar system. Future works based on this model is proposed.


MS3 seminar

Dynamic rainfall monitoring using microwave links

Venkat Roy

We propose a sparsity-exploiting dynamic rainfall monitoring methodology using rain-induced attenuation measurements from microwave links. To estimate the rainfall intensity dynamically from a limited number of non-linear measurements, we exploit the physical properties of rainfall such as spatial sparsity and non-negativity along with the dynamics of the rainfall. We develop a dynamic state estimation algorithm, where the aforementioned spatial properties are utilized as prior information. To exploit spatial sparsity, we use a basis function to tailor the sparse representation of the rainfall intensity. The developed methodology is applied to dynamically monitor the rainfall field intensity in an area with a specified spatial resolution using less number of simulated non-linear measurements than pixels. The proposed methodology can be generalized for any dynamic field reconstruction, where the limited number of non-linear measurements are field intensities integrated over a linear path.

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PhD Thesis Defence

Radar networks performance analysis and topology optimization

Inna Ivashko

Inna Ivashko succesfully defended her defence on December 13th.

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Microelectronics Introduction Colloquium

Introduction 3 new Tenure Trackers

Masoud Babaie, Morteza Alavi, Faruk Uysal

On December 12 we organize the next Microelectronics Colloquium to introduce three new Assistant Professors (Tenure Trackers) of the Microelectronics department. They are happy to present a lecture about their research.

The colloquium start at 15.00 hrs. there will be a drink afterwards in the foyer.
Location: Theatre of Culture Builing (38) Mekelweg 10.
Please register online if you want to attend, latest December 5.

  • Masoud Babaie: Pushing The Limits of CMOS Circuits for Emerging Technologies
    Within the next few years, quantum processors, Fifth Generation (5G) cellular systems and the wireless Internet-of-Things (IoT) are expected to see significant deployment to realize more integration between the physical and digital worlds, promising enormous computation power, high data rate communications and enabling more objects to be remotely sensed and controlled.

    This talk will address some of the main challenges in the design and implementation of IoT devices, mm-wave 5G transceivers, and cryogenic CMOS controller for quantum computers. An overview of my past and ongoing research activities will be also presented, with emphasis on novel solutions to improve power efficiency and spectral purity of RF/mm-wave transceivers.

  • Morteza Alavi: Universal Transmitters for 5G
    Today, our daily activities are intertwined with the Internet. The ever-growing demand to swiftly get access to the data-cloud systems leads to huge data traffic. In order to seamlessly transmit and receive these gigantic data, _ 40 GB, agile radio-frequency (RF) transceivers are inevitable.

    These radios must be capable of supporting the current and future communication standards such as 5th generation of wireless mobile communications. The ultimate goal is that they can be implemented as universal radios whose modes of operation can be defined by their clients. To address these demands, RF transmitters are currently reinvented and are directed towards digital-intensive architecture. In this short presentation, we will briefly describe the strengths,possibilities, and challenges that exist for these advanced transmitters. First and foremost, the concept of RF-DAC based transmitters will be introduced. Next, the talk will review various RF-DAC based transmitters that have already been implemented at ELCA. Eventually, the presentation will concisely unveil the future directions of the research of these software-defined transmitters at ELCA.

  • Faruk Uysal: Distributed Radar Networks: Beyond a single radar
    The number of operational radar is rapidly increasing due to the growing demand of the remote sensing. Software defined radio and emerging single-chip radar technology make use of radars in every aspect of life such as autonomous driving, safety and security applications. With the increase of active transmitters, spectrum management and coexistence started to become a concern for some radar systems. In this talk, the previous applications of waveform, frequency agility will be reviewed to bring multi-functionality to the modern radar system. Finally, we will discuss the future research for distributed radar networks and how to fuse data from various radars to acquire different aspects of a target to be viewed simultaneously.


Master theis defence Nannan Chen

Nannan Chen


Poster event 2016

PhD's from MS3 will present their posters in our annual poster event


Master thesis defence Wilco Tempert

Design of a Particle Filter for robust target tracking in object-induced clutter


Master thesis defence Jeroen Keijsers

Jeroen Keijsers

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Master thesis defence Michael Hambalis

Michael Hambalis

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Special Celebrative Seminar: New model of Sino-Dutch R&D cooperation


Since the establishment of TU Delft's Beijing Research Centre (BRC) in 2012, 10 PhD researchers have been enrolled for this unique program in close cooperation with our Chinese Academic Partners. We are very pleased that the first two BRC PhD candidates will have their PhD thesis defence on September 19 2016, in the Aula of Delft University of Technology.

To celebrate this important milestone, we would like to invite you to join a special seminar after the defences, about the New model of Sino-Dutch R&D cooperation, to share the experiences, look to the future and raise the glass together.

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Multivariate signal processing for "big data" sensing

Gabril Vasile
GIPSA lab, Grenoble

Big datasensing brings a strong impact on many sensor-oriented application fields, suchas disaster control and monitor, healthcare services, and environmentprotection. This presentation aims at providing anoverview on several application-drivensignal processing schemes, which have been carried outin the field of environment protection at theGrenoble-Image-sPeech-Signal-AutomaticsLab.


Master thesis defence Roel Berns


Master theis defence Roeland Trommel

Roeland Trommel

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Join project presentations of Msc course System Engineering

Students System Engineering

Students present and defend their group projects Including: - Crashed Aeroplane and Treasure Finding Sensor Hive - Low Cost and Unobtrusive Elderly House - Increasing the Accessibility of Hydrocephalus Diagnosis in Uganda - Interchangeable Block Design of Prorail System - DC house For : all Faculty Staff and PhD students


Master thesis defence Yanki Aslan


Seminar Nikita Petrov

Nikita Petrov

Seminar in the MS3 seminar cycle

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Seminar Shilong Sun

Shilong Sun

Seminar in the MS3 seminar cycle

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Greedy algorithm for radar network topology optimization

Inna Ivashko

In this work, we tackle the problem of the selection of the optimal radar nodes positions, which provides the most accurate estimation of the target parameters, namely the position and velocity vectors. We develop a generic framework for topology optimization based on non-linear measurement models. Both the frame potential (FP) and log-determinant (LD) of the error covariance matrix are used as performance metrics. These cost functions were shown to be submodular that allows one to use greedy optimization algorithms ensuring a low computational complexity. We redesign the FP and LD to our specific non-linear model, where the parameter vector can take any value from the known parameter space and can be represented by entries of different modalities (e.g., range, velocity). The developed theoretical framework is applied to the problem of topology optimization for FMCW radar network.

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High-accuracy Positioning in Multipath Channels: Location-Awareness for 5G Networks

Klaus Witrisal
Graz University of Technology

Location-awareness is the capability of a mobile network to employ position information for the sake of operating more efficiently. It is foreseen that fifth-generation (5G) wireless networks will be able to exploit much more accurate position information than any previous generation of wireless networks. This comes naturally due to the increased bandwidth and the application of multi-antenna techniques, which will eventually turn multipath propagation from an enemy to a friend.

This talk will first highlight the impact of multipath propagation on the accuracy of wireless range and position estimation. The important influence of bandwidth and the benefit of MIMO processing will be analyzed. Next it will be shown how one can make use of multipath to benefit from improved positioning accuracy, robustness, and a relaxed need for infrastructure nodes. Analytical performance bounds, their experimental validation, and algorithms derived thereof will be discussed. Finally, it will be shown that a multipath-enabled positioning system is a showcase example of a cognitive dynamic system that can optimize the information gained from each measurement, exploiting its memory of past measurements to plan future measurements. The environment map it collects can be used to predict the propagation characteristics, yielding location-awareness for positioning and communications. It is concluded that the use of position information may become as important to 5G networks as other new, disruptive technologies such as massive MIMO and mm-wave.

Biography

Klaus Witrisal received the Dipl.-Ing. degree in electrical engineering from Graz University of Technology, Graz, Austria, in 1997, the Ph.D. degree (cum laude) from Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands, in 2002, and the Habilitation from Graz University of Technology in 2009. He is currently an Associate Professor at the Signal Processing and Speech Communication Laboratory (SPSC) of Graz University of Technology, Graz, Austria, where he has been participating in various national and European research projects focused on UWB communications and positioning. He is co-chair of the Technical Working Group "Indoor'' of the COST Action IC1004 "Cooperative Smart Radio Communications for Green Smart Environments.'' His research interests are in signal processing for wideband and UWB wireless communications, propagation channel modeling, and positioning. Prof. Witrisal served as a leading chair for the IEEE Workshop on Advances in Network Localization and Navigation (ANLN) at the IEEE Intern. Conf. on Communications (ICC) 2013 - 2016, as a TPC (co)-chair of the Workshop on Positioning, Navigation and Communication (WPNC) 2011, 2014, and 2015, and as a co-organizer of the Workshop on Localization in UHF RFID at the IEEE 5th Annual Intern. Conf. on RFID, 2011. He is an associate editor of IEEE Communications Letters since 2013.


Master thesis defence Joris Derksen

A study of radar performance assessment accuracy sensitivity to the resolution of atmospheric input data Case studies of North

Joris Derksen

Radars are vital systems for the navy as they are the primary systems for the detection, tracking and sometimes classification of friendly and hostile targets. It is therefore important that navies can assess the radars performance under the prevailing conditions. The atmosphere can significantly alter the radars performance from standard. Nowadays computer models can fairly accurately predict radar performance if sufficient atmospheric input data is available. While many studies are dedicated to accurately model radar performance, little has yet been done to define how accurate and how high in resolution atmospheric data must be to suffice as input for accurate radar performance prediction. My study takes preliminary steps into finding horizontal and temporal resolution requirements for different weather conditions. The study I will present will be particular of interest to the Royal Netherlands Navy as they currently predict radar performance with a single vertical profile and thereby assume that the atmosphere is horizontally homogenous. My thesis clearly shows that using a single profile can result in erroneous radar performance predictions. In these cases 3D dimensional data is required, which, for example, numerical weather prediction models can obtain. In additions to the description of my topic above, I have attached my abstract and preface. I have also attached a figure that shows an example of the error that can occur when using a single profile rather that 3D atmospheric input data.


Seminar Sharef Neemat

Sharef Neemat

Seminar in our seminar cycle

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Automotive radar

Holger Meinel (automotive specialist Germany), Riender Happee (TU Delft)

The Dutch Automated Vehicle Initiative (DAVI) aims to investigate, improve and demonstrate automated driving on public roads (http://davi.connekt.nl). In a range of projects DAVI aims to: assess & improve automation technology, study human behaviour, assess safety, pursue legalisation, and create public awareness. The presentation will provide an overview of DAVI and Automotive research at TU Delft, including the WEpods project on driverless public transport and the interaction with pedestrians and other vulnerable road users (http://davi.connekt.nl/wepods-project). Riender Happee coordinates Automotive research and education at TU Delft with a focus on human factors, biomechanics, automated driving, and driver modelling. Automotive radar based on millimetre waves - today in the 24/ 26 GHz and in the 77/ 79 GHz range has been under investigation and development since several decades. Already in the early 1970ies first 35 GHz radar sensors were tested over several millions of road kilometres. Since 1998 beginning with an ACC (Autonomous Cruise Control) radar sensor in the Mercedes-Benz S-class sedan automotive radar is commercially available and employed by various OEMs all over the world, and no longer in expensive Premium cars only. With the standard-series implementation of the CPA 2.0 sensor (Collision Prevention Assist) in the Mercedes-Benz B-class in September 2011 radar sensor democratization for the benefit of vehicle safety has become reality. These days such radar systems are used for various vehicular applications, predominantly for functions like ACC, or BSD (Blind Spot Detection) to name just 2 important safety functions. The final goal of autonomous driving has come into view, e.g. the Bertha-Benz-Drive by Mercedes, Drive Me by Volvo or the iBus by Yutong Bus Co. Ltd. in China. Different frequency bands, modulation schemes, emission powers, or radiation patterns are employed today. However, more sophisticated approaches, like DBF (Digital BeamForming) antennas or polarimetric signal evaluation are - concerning automotive radar - still in research and development. Automotive radar, its history, todays state-of-the-art for comfort and safety as well as possible future trends on the road to autonomous driving will be reviewed in this lecture. From feet off (SAE level 2) to brains off (SAE level 5) ? we will have to see when Curriculum Vitae Holger H. Meinel joined the AEG-TELEFUNKEN Advanced Technology Department in Ulm, Germany, in 1973 after graduating with a Diploma in Microwave Engineering from the RWTH AACHEN in Aachen, Germany. He started to design mm-wave components, among others for a 35 GHz collision avoidance radar. Never changing company but only their names over the last 40 years, he switched his location and role of work nearly every 5 years. However, working in the US or France in the 1980s, and again the US in the 1990s he normally was located in Germany. Coming full circle in his career, from May 2010 to December 2012 he has been responsible for external contacts of Daimler AG within the EU-Project MOSARIM (More Safety for All by Radar Interference Mitigation); thus finally coming back-to-his-roots again: ACC radar for cars. Holger H. Meinel is author and co-author of over 175 technical papers, mostly on millimeter-wave integration and application. He holds or has held 14 patents and among other things has been involved in key-functions with the European Microwave Association (EuMA). During the restructuring of the European Microwave Conference (EuMC) from 1996 to 1998 he served in the newly founded Steering Committee, and became one of the 6 founder members of EuMA. He especially fostered application oriented contributions to EuMW, as well as he supported and enhanced the student involvement in EuMA. In 2011 during the EuMW in Manchester, UK, - he was awarded with the EuMA Distinguished Service Award for his lifelong contributions to the microwave community. Since September 2014 he officially is in retirement. However, since then he has been actively involved in different conferences and events, concerning automotive radar and autonomous driving, such as: EuRAD 2014 in Rome (Oct.), Telematics Munich 2014 (Nov.), Automotive Tech.AD 2015 in Berlin (Feb.), EuMC 2015 in Paris (Sept.), 2nd International Forum on Intelligent Vehicles, 2015, in Chengdu, China, Telematics Stuttgart 2015 (Nov.), or recently again Automotive Tech.AD 2016 in Berlin (Feb.). In January 2015 Holger H. Meinel was appointed by the EuMA BOD to be the speaker of the EuRaMIG (European Radio and Microwave Interest Group), one of three core groups within EuMA, for the next 3 years. EuRaMIG being the body to hold contact with the EU-Commission for EuMA on behalf of innovative technology related EU calls.


Seminar Xuan Wang

Xuan Wang

Seminar in the MS3 seminar cycle

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Seminar Arun Muraleedharan

Arun Muraleedharan

Seminar in the MS3 Seminar Cycle

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Seminar Rossiza Gourova

Automotive radar

Rossiza Gourova

Automotive radar is gaining more and more popularity in the recent years with the growing idea of driverless vehicles. In order to achieve that final goal, the equipment used to monitor the environment needs to be reliable in every situation. To ensure that, it is necessary to determine the trustworthiness of a single sensor and define the means to monitor its own reliability level. The radar needs to be aware of its surroundings and its own functionality as the problem of reliability spans both the hardware comprising the sensor as well as the external influence of the environment. In this seminar, the factors influencing the reliability are discussed, as well as the current state of the art radar in the automotive field.

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Antenna Design at Fraunhofer FHR

Peter Knott
Fraunhofer Institute for High Frequency Physics and Radar Techniques

The Fraunhofer Institute for High Frequency Physics and Radar Techniques FHR in Wachtberg, Germany, develops concepts, methods and systems of electromagnetic sensors, particularly in the field of radar and communication, jointly with novel signal processing methods and innovative technology from the microwave to the lower Terahertz region. The institutes competency covers almost every aspect of modern radar and communication techniques.

The presentation will give an overview of research at FHR and its department AEM, including EM Modelling and Antenna Technology. Specific research topics will be presented, e.g. in the field of Automotive and Maritime Radar, Conformal Array and Circular Switched Parasitic Antennas (CSPA).

Peter Knott joined Fraunhofer FHR in 1994. The focus of his work is design and development of antenna arrays and active antenna front-ends as well as electromagnetic modelling and beamforming methods for conformal antenna arrays. Since 2005 he is head of the Department Antenna Technology and Electromagnetic Modelling (AEM). Until 2012, he has been chairman of the NATO research task group SET-131 on Vibration Control and Structure Integration of Antennas. He has published numerous articles in scientific journals and on conferences and holds several patents. Dr. Knott is also an Assistant Professor of Antenna Engineering at RWTH Aachen University. He is currently chairman of the German IEEE MTT/AP Joint Chapter, member of the VDE/ITG board 7.1 on Antennas, and member of the Board of Trustees of the German Institute of Navigation (DGON e.V.).


Seminar Alvaro Blanco del Campo

Alvaro Blanco-del-Campo

Seminar in our seminar cycle

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Midterm presentation Yanki Aslan

Mutual coupling reduction between closely spaced patch antennas via dielectric-contrast technique: Analysis and Design

Yanki Alsan

In recent years, many techniques have been introduced so as to suppress the propagation of surface waves and weaken the coupling between array elements, which include the use of electromagnetic band gap (EBG) structures, frequency selective surfaces (FSS) and ground slits. However, it is clear that the use of such structures leads to an increase in the inter-element spacing and the fabrication complexity. In his PhD thesis [1], Shenario Valavan explained the need to use the inter-element spacing smaller than 0.4λ in order to maintain the wide-angle scanning capability of dual or multi-band arrays at the operational bands and he proposed a novel approach called the dielectric-contrast technique to reduce the mutual coupling between closely spaced (0.3λ-0.5λ) patch antennas by modifying the propagation velocity of the surface wave. In this technique, a higher permittivity middle-layer is inserted in the homogeneous substrate. In this Msc project, the physics behind this approach is investigated by computing the Greens functions for layered media that can show the behavior of the space and surface waves, which constitute the total wave obtained from the simulators. The aim is to optimize design parameters such as the position and thickness of the inserted layer, the inter-element spacing and the dielectric contrast ratio in order to reduce the coupling.


Seminar Xuan Wang

Xuan Wang

Seminar in MS3 seminar cycle

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A Machine Learning Framework for Landmine Detection Using Ground Penetrating Radar

Iraklis Giannakis

Ground penetrating radar (GPR) for landmine detection is a multi-parametric problem. Landmines can be found in a variety of environments e.g. deserts, urban environments, jungles and so on. The great variation of the soils, targets and antenna units may result to substantially different outputs making the development of an inclusive processing approach a very challenging task. The aforementioned complexity is further enhanced by logistic constrains and issues associated to the uniqness of demining. In particular, demining requires real-time outputs resulting from handheld units with no accurate positioning operated by deminers with no expertise in GPR. The above, make machine learning an attractive choice for both detection and classification purposes. In the present seminar, we discuss the challenges and the necessary steps towards an inclusive and robust machine learning framework for demining.

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Antenna elements for phased antenna array

Jan Puskely

Wide-angle scanning arrays have gained increasing attention for wideband radio astronomy, satellite communication and radar applications. The performance of these arrays places high demands on the design of antenna element in terms of size, feeding technique, radiation pattern, coupling, etc. In this presentation, short introduction into the design of phased antenna array elements will be given. Thereafter some designs of antenna elements enabling wide bandwidth and wide-angle scanning performances will be presented.

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Jianping Wang

Seminar in our seminar cycle

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MS3 seminar

NeXtRAD

Mike Inggs
University of Cape Town Sout Africa

NetRAD is a three node, multistatic radar with three active nodes, one being high power (450 W), operating at 2400 MHz. It uses a GPSDO system for data capture and synchronisation. A large database of multistatic sea and sea target data has been built up. Samples of the data will be presented. NeXtRAD is a continuation of NetRAD, but has moved to X and L Bands, high power, and is fully polarimetric. The overall system will be presented, with progress to date in its construction and testing. Plans for data capture will be discussed.

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MSc TC Thesis Presentation

Sparse Arrays: Vector Sensors and Design Algorithms

Shilpa Rao

Direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation of acoustic sources is of great interest in a number of applications. Acoustic vector sensors (AVSs) provide an edge over traditional scalar sensors since they measure the acoustic velocity field in addition to the acoustic pressure. It is known that a uniform linear array (ULA) of M conventional scalar sensors can identify up to M-1 DOAs. However, using second-order statistics, the class of sparse scalar sensor arrays have been shown to identify more source DOAs than the number of sensors. In this thesis, we extend these results using sparse AVS arrays. We first assume that the sources are quasi-stationary and use the Khatri-Rao subspace approach to estimate the source DOAs. In addition, a spatial-velocity smoothing technique is proposed to estimate the DOAs of stationary sources. For both scenarios, we show that the number of source DOAs that can be identified is significantly greater than the number of physical vector sensors. The second problem considered in this thesis is sensor selection for non-linear models. It is often necessary to guarantee a certain estimation accuracy by choosing the best subset of the available set of sensors. A non-linear measurement model in additive Gaussian noise is considered. To solve the sensor selection problem, which is inherently combinatorial, a greedy algorithm based on submodular cost functions is developed. The proposed low-complexity greedy algorithm is computationally attractive as compared to existing sensor selection solvers for non-linear models. The submodular cost ensures optimality of the greedy algorithm. Such a sensor selection can be applied, for example, to design sparse AVS arrays that also ensure a certain quality of the DOA estimates next to their identifiability.

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7th International Summer School on Radar/SAR


The 7th International Summer School on Radar/SAR will take place near Bonn, Germany, on 10-17 July 2015.

For more information about the Summer School visit the web-site and/or download the poster or flyer.

The fee, which includes full board and lodging, and handout-material, is for students 600 Euro, PhD candidates 900 Euro, and all others 1200 Euro for the whole summer school week. The participants have only to organize and pay their travel to Haus Humboldtstein, the location of the Summer School. See the programme for more detail.

Fraunhofer FHR cordially invites appropriate candidates to visit our website for further information and to download the Application form. Specific queries regarding the summer school should be addressed to: matthias.weiss@fhr.fraunhofer.de.

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Albert OudeNijhuis

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Final MSc thesis presentation

Gatan Pinaud


Final MSc thesis presentation

Michal Pena Bolland


3rd International Workshop on Compressed Sensing Theory and its Applications to Radar, Sonar and Remote Sensing

Following the success of the previous two editions of the workshop on compressive sensing applied to radar, we are pleased to announce the third one in this series. The 3rd Int. Workshop on Compressed Sensing Theory and its Applications to Radar, Sonar and Remote Sensing (CoSeRa 2015) will be held in Pisa (Italy) on 22-24 June 2015. The aim of CoSeRa is to bring experts of Compressive Sensing (CS) and radar/sonar/EO/IR signal processing and remote sensing together to explore the state-of-the-art in development of CS techniques for different areas of applications and to turn out its advantages or possible drawbacks compared to classical solutions.

Topics include but are not limited to:

  • Compressive sensing theory
  • Mathematical aspects of Compressive sensing in imaging systems
  • Sparsity of Radar/SAR/Sonar/IR signals
  • Applications of sparse sensing in Radar/SAR/Sonar/IR signal processing
  • Compressive sensing for SAR tomography (TomoSAR)
  • Compressive sensing for SAR Interferometry (InSAR)
  • Compressive sensing for Inverse SAR (ISAR)
  • Target detection based on compressive sensing
  • Compressive sensing for slow GMTI
  • Co-prime sampling in radar/sonar/EO/IR systems
  • Co-prime array processing in radar/sonar/EO/IR systems
  • Nested sampling in radar/sonar/EO/IR systems
  • Netsted array processing in radar/sonar/EO/IR systems
  • Sparse sensing in synthetic aperture imaging systems

Important Dates

  • Full five-page paper submission: February 2, 2015
  • Notification of acceptance: March 16, 2015
  • Final camera-ready papers and author registration: April 20, 2015

All accepted and presented papers will be referenced by IEEEXplore

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Flat Optics

Professor Stefano Maci
Professor at the University of Siena (UNISI) and Director of UNISIs Ph.D. School of Information Engineering and Science

Metasurfaces constitute a class of thin metamaterials used for controlling plane waves and surface wave. At microwave frequencies, they are constituted by sub-wavelength size patches printed on thin grounded dielectric substrates. By averaging the tangential fields, metasurfaces may be characterized by homogenised isotropic or anisotropic boundary conditions, which can be approximated through homogeneous equivalent impedances. In the low frequency regime and in absence of losses, this impedance supports the propagation of a surface wave. The impedance can be spatially modulated by locally changing the size/orientation of the printed elements. This allows for a deformation of the wavefront which addresses the local wavector along not-rectilinear paths. The ray paths are subjected to an eikonal equation analogue to the one for Geometrical Optics rays in graded index materials. For this reason we will refer to the theory which regulates the SW propagation as Flat Optics. In this presentation, we introduce the Flat Optics theory for surface waves for both isotropic and anisotropic MTS, deriving the basic relations between ray-paths, ray velocity and transport of energy for both isotropic and anisotropic boundary conditions. The relationship with Transformation Optics is discussed.


Alvaro Blanco-del-Campo

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Antennas for Frequency Reconfigurable Phased Arrays

PhD thesis defence

Nadia Haider

Sensors such as phased array radars play a crucial role in public safety. They are unavoidable for surveillance, threat identification and post-disaster management. However, different scenarios impose immensely diverse requirements for these systems. Phased array systems occupy a large space. In addition, if different antenna systems are needed for each function, the space required can be considerably large. For transportable platforms, such as ships and aircrafts, space and weight are at a premium. Therefore, reconfigurable multi-band antennas are very attractive solutions for future multi-function sensor systems. Within this research work three different approaches are investigated to realize antennas for reconfigurable phased arrays. Wideband antenna designs constitute the first approach. Integrating this type of antennas with frequency selective filters provide the opportunity for fine tuning within one radar band. The wideband operation of the antenna is achieved by the blind-via feeding section and the quasi electric-magnetic radiating structure. The second approach involves the design of an antenna element with p-I-n diode switches. The switches are used to alter the antenna structure and thereby the operating frequency. Measured results verified the frequency reconfigurable capability of the antenna within L/S radar bands with frequency ratio more than 2:1. The planar structure, the back feeding mechanism, the compact size and the simple bias network made the proposed antenna suitable for array applications. The large frequency ratio and its usability in phased array applications made the design novel. Furthermore, for these frequency reconfigurable elements, a unique multi-scale array structure is introduced which can assure wide angle scanning for both frequency bands. The advantage of this novel array configuration is twofold: reduce the Mutual couplings in the lower band, and increase the scanning volume for the higher band. A planar array demonstrator validated the proposed concept. In the third approach the operational band of an antenna is tuned by variableimpedance matching. In this study, the standard 50 Ω matching is avoided and many advantages of variable-impedance matching are demonstrated. First, the principle is verified by tuning the frequency band of a microstrip antenna by an input-impedance tuneable CMOS RF-frontend. In the second design a novel dual-band E-slot antenna,with 2.5:1 frequency ratio, was designed. By changing the input-impedance the operating frequency of the antenna can be switched from L- to S-band. Variable impedance matching provides few other advantages to phased array antennas. A scan-angle dependent impedance matching will assure low reflection coefficients for the entire scanning volume. On the other hand, it will reduce interfering and jamming signals coming from adjacent angles. The outcomes of this research work have led to solid understanding of how we can realize frequency reconfigurable antennas for adaptive phased arrays. The results will be particularly valuable in developing future narrow or wide beam radar systems with frequency reconfiguration and angular filtering capabilities.

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Sensor Data Fusion @ Fraunhofer FKIE: Surveillance and Protection for Defence and Security Applications

Dr. Wolfgang Koch from FKIE, Bonn
Fraunhofer FKIE, Bonn, Germany

Advanced algorithms to effectively exploit data streams from heterogeneous sources and optimally manage available sensor and unmanned platforms are of crucial importance. The talk will provide an overview of both, methodological work and advanced applications at Fraunhofer FKIE. We will place emphasis on exact track-to-track fusion, multistatic exploration and passive surveillance, aspects of resources management, and fusion tasks with unmanned aerial vehicles.


PhD Thesis Defence

Sensor management for surveillance and tracking. An operational perspective. March 5, 12.00 Aula, Senaatszaal. Promotor A. Yarovoy, co- promotor, H. Driessen

Fotios Katsilieris

Defence, March 5, 12.00 Aula, Senaatszaal. Sensor management for surveillance and tracking. An operational perspective. In the literature, several approaches to sensor (including radar) management can be found. These can be roughly grouped into: a) rule-based or heuristics; b) task-based; c) information-driven; and d) risk/threat-based. These approaches are compared in this dissertation and it is found that there is not a single approach that is both Bayes-optimal and takes into account explicitly the user requirements in different operational contexts. In order to overcome the challenges with the existing approaches, this dissertation proposes managing the uncertainty in higher-level quantities (as per the JDL model) that are directly of interest to an operator and directly related to the operational goal of a radar system. The proposed approach is motivated by the threat assessment process, which is an integral part of defence missions. Accordingly, a prominent example of a commonly used higher-level quantity is the threat-level of a target. The key advantage of the proposed approach is that it results in Bayes-optimal sensor control that also takes into account the operational context in a model-based manner. In other words: a) a radar operator can select the aspects of threat that are relevant to the operational context at hand; and b) external information about the arrival of targets and other scenario parameters can be included when defining the models used in the signal processing algorithms, leading to context-adaptive sensor management.

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Spectral Polarimetric approach to remote sensing of natural objects and environments

Prof. Felix Yanovsky

This presentation introduces a new method of remote sensing that combines polarimetric and spectral features of signals received from distant objects, providing spectral analysis of polarimetric variables. The detailed theory and math models are developed for the case of rain observations, and generalizations are made for other objects, and some examples are provided.


'Clutter Diversity: a new degree of freedom in multistatic radar'

Prof. Hugh Griffiths

Recent work has shown that the properties of bistatic radar clutter depend strongly on the bistatic geometry. This opens up new possibilities in networked radar, suggesting that the configuration can be optimised to take advantage of the clutter and target properties. The lecture will review these ideas, and the underlying concept of the intelligent adaptive radar network


Mission-driven resource management for reconfigurable sensing systems

Teun de Groot

Promotor prof. Alexander Yarovoy, co promotor dr. Oleg Krasnov

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MS3 PhD event

MS3 PhD event

Annual overview of PhD research projects


PhD Thesis Defence

A GPS inspired terrain referenced navigation algorithm

Daniela Vaman

Terrain Referenced Navigation (TRN) refers to a form of localization in which measurements of distances to the terrain surface are matched with a digital elevation map allowing a vehicle to estimate its own position within the map. The main goal of this dissertation is to improve TRN performance through better signal processing. More specifically, the project aims to explore opportunities in the field of TRN by using digital signal processing techniques that were originally developed for the acquisition and tracking of GPS signals.

A typical TRN system uses speed, heading and time to establish the relative horizontal position between subsequent elevation measurements. Thus, any error in speed, heading or time will cause an error in the resulting relative position. If the speed or heading error contains a bias, this will cause a gradual reduction in the correlation. To prevent that a reduction in correlation causes the estimated position to drift away, the idea behind the research described in this thesis is the use of arrays of terrain elevation measurements with intentional (positive and negative) offsets in speed and heading in a tracking-loop configuration. It is well known that such a concept works well for optimized signals such as the ones used in GPS.

To further explore the viability of this idea for a signal defined by a series of terrain elevation measurements, an analysis of similarities and differences with the GPS signal is performed. In accordance to the GPS receiver approach, a novel correlation algorithm for TRN is proposed and implemented. The basic rationale for the algorithm is to use terrain correlation to acquire and track the speed and heading of the host vehicle, while the position advances are calculated using these estimates together with the previously determined position. The novelty of the approach consists in the implementation of a tracking scheme based on the DLL concept. To answer feasibility-related questions, the algorithm is first evaluated in a purely theoretical framework. Based on this analysis it is concluded that the concept seems feasible and promising, but additional considerations in the design are required to compensate for the differences between the GPS and TRN signals. Enhancements are brought to the initial design resulting in the development of an adaptive tracking scheme, in which the tracking loops are configured based on an analysis of the terrain signal.

Next, an in-depth sensitivity analysis is carried out to understand how sensor measurement errors (in speed, heading and terrain height) impact the algorithm performance. The analysis is performed using exclusively simulated data. It is shown that sensitivity to speed and heading errors is dependent on terrain features and it is possible to assess the degree of sensitivity by analysing the terrain signal. By combining this information with the expected error characteristic of the navigation sensors, the performance of the algorithm can be predicted. The sensitivity to terrain measurement errors depends on the ratio between the terrain signal strength and the measurement errors. It is shown that this ratio can be predicted up to a certain extent and a method to improve the ratio is proposed and discussed.

The developed capabilities are validated with recorded sensor data from flight tests. Two different types of recorded sensor data are used: radar and lidar based datasets.

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VWO Math & Science Class

Pilot meeting

Alexander Yarovoy (EWI), Yaroslav Blanter (TNW)

Pilot Math & Science Class van start

Op 31 oktober start de pilot Math & Science Class. In dit onderwijsprogramma van twintig dagdelen, worden leerlingen uit 5 vwo uitgedaagd en gestimuleerd om op een meer wetenschappelijke manier om te gaan met wiskunde en science. Achttien scholieren nemen deel aan de pilot. De opleidingen Technische Natuurkunde, Technische Wiskunde, Technische Informatica en Elektrotechniek ervaren al een aantal jaren een hoge uitval van studenten in het eerste jaar. Met de pilot Math & Science Class willen de faculteiten TNW en EWI scholieren de kans geven om het 'gat' tussen voortgezet en hoger onderwijs te overbruggen. De scholieren maken kennis met de manier van denken die nodig is voor het succesvol volgen van een studie aan de TU Delft.

Science project

De pilot is bestemd voor leerlingen met een N&T-profiel die interesse hebben in een studie aan de TU Delft. Op 31 oktober starten achttien scholieren, zij zijn voorgedragen door de scholen in het scholennetwerk van de universiteit. Op 1 mei wordt de pilot afgesloten met een demonstratie van het science project, waar de scholieren in de laatste weken van het programma aan werken.

Initiatief

Math & Science Class is een initiatief van Alexander Yarovoy (EWI) en Yaroslav Blanter (TNW). Samen met Sylvia Walsarie (O&S ) en het scholennetwerk hebben zij deze pilot opgezet.

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Bistatic SAR multi-angle image enhancement and differential interferometry technology based on GNSS satellite

Prof. Cheng Hu
Beijing Institute of Technology

Bistatic SAR (BiSAR) systems have attracted the interests from global researchers and become a hotspot in the international radar community due to the progress of radar technology and rapidly increased applications nowadays. As a special kind of BiSAR systems, BiSAR based on GNSS satellite has a lot of advantages because of the time and space continuity of GNSS satellite, such as multi-angle observation and long-time monitoring. Therefore, some BiSAR experimental results based on GNSS satellite will be presented, especially for the multi-angle fusion enhancement and image understanding. Meanwhile, a novel BiSAR differential interferometry technology based on GNSS satellite will be discussed, the primary experimental results will be shown.

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International Radar Conference 2014, Lille, France

Alexander Yarovoy, François Le Chevalier, Fotios Katsilieris, Nikita Petrov, Alexey Narykov, Oleg Krasnov

The French SEE Society (Socit de l'Electricit, de l'Electronique, et des Technologies de l'Information et de la Communication) organises RADAR 2014 in Lille, from 13 to 17 of October 2014. The conference will be organized in the frame of the international relations set up between the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET), the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the Chinese Institute of Electronics (CIE), the Institution of Engineers Australia (IEAust) and the SEE.

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11th European Radar Conference (EuRAD 2014), Rome, Italy

Oleg Krasnov, Inna Ivashko, Alexander Yarovoy

The 11th European Radar Conference (EuRAD 2014) will be held from October the 8-th to October the 10-th, 2014 in Rome, Italy, in the framework of the European Microwave Week 2014. This Radar Conference is the major European event for the present status and the future trends in the field of radar technology, system design, and applications. In the radar and sub-systems area, the conference focuses on radar EM scattering and propagation, antenna design, modelling and measurements, active/passive phased arrays and transceiver technologies, also for dual use applications (radar/communications). The radar signal processing topic intends to collect the main recent research innovative contributions on digital beamforming, interferometry, polarimetry, waveform diversity, tracking and target localization, multidimensional radar imaging. A specific focus is also expected on the use of compressive sensing for radar application. Radar architecture and systems topic addresses all new kinds of sensors starting from the more classical ones, namely CW, over-the-horizon, passive, noise and polarimetric radar, up to the most complex and sophisticated architectures like UWB systems, multidimensional radar, multifunctional systems. New tools for radar system performance modelling and simulation are also included. Radar applications are also encouraged covering various fields such as environmental, surveillance, traffic control, automotive, avionic, homeland security and defence, medical and other possible radar uses.

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Receivers Topology Optimization of the Combined Active and WiFi-based Passive Radar Network

Presentation for the EuRAD14 conference

Inna Ivashko

This paper focuses on the accuracy analysis of the combined active and WiFi-based passive radar network. The Cramer-Rao Lower Bound is used as an accuracy metric. It is shown that localization performance of the active radar network can be improved with exploitation of the signals from passive bistatic WiFi radars. This makes reasonable to use information from passive and active radars simultaneously in order to enhance system localization capability. Sparsity-based algorithm is applied to find optimum geometry of the WiFi receivers at the fixed positions of the WiFi access points and active radars.

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Effectiveness-based radar resource management for target tracking

Presentation for the RADAR14 conference

Alexey Narykov

Radar resource management (RRM) is an active research field that attracts attention of both the scientists and industry experts. A discussion of the various approaches to RRM became essentially a discussion on how to formulate the optimization problem. Although much work has been done on optimal performance-based RRM, the approaches that take mission objectives into account still belong to the domain of heuristic RRM. This paper proposes a shift from performance-based management and presents a novel effectiveness-based approach to optimal RRM. The approach is illustrated with a case study of single target tracking.

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Outlook for a new wind field retrieval technique: The 4D-Var wind retrieval

Presentation for the RADAR14 conference

Albert OudeNijhuis

In this presentation we introduce the 4D-Var wind retrieval, which is inspired on four-dimensional variational assimilation, typically used in numerical weather models. We simulate simple wind scenarios, with single or double vortices, to get insight in radar measurements. We apply the linear wind model to radar measurements of IDRA radar measurements and identify some problems with the linear wind model retrieval technique. Then we apply the 4D-Var wind retrieval on the same IDRA measurements and the results are compared and discussed. In the implementation it is possible to specify correlation lengths for the horizontal wind speed and horizontal wind direction. With this option, it is possible to show the ambiguity of the wind field, that is associated with the radar measurements.

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MEST welcome drink

Meet and greet your friends and colleagues with a FREE Drink to say Hallo !!!

Organized by MEST student association

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MSc TC Thesis Presentation

Indoor Granularity Presence Sensing and Control Messaging with an Ultrasonic Circular Array

Shahrzad Naghibzadeh


MSc ME Thesis Presentation

Development of a Multichannel TCSPC System in a Spartan 6 FPGA

Harald Homulle

For the master project work was carried out for the development of a fluorescence lifetime imaging probe for fluorescence guided surgery. For this project a prototype was designed. The work on the prototype was divided into three main parts, hardware, firmware / software, and system / optics. In this thesis the firmware / software of the system are described. An overview of the system is given and the performance is evaluated.

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MSc TC Thesis Presentation

Joint Angle-Frequency Estimation for Multiple Signals with Circular Arrays

Joost Geelhoed
CAS, TNO

(Work carried out at TNO Defence, Safety and Security--The Hague)

In electronic warfare information about radio signals is gathered. Parameters as the directionof- arrival (DOA) and the frequency can be estimated from sampled data received on antenna arrays. The objective of this thesis is to design a joint angle-frequency estimation (JAFE) algorithm for a circular uniform antenna array.

A 1-D and 2-D JAFE algorithm is presented. Both algorithms use phase-mode excitation and ESPRIT. The 1-D algorithm with spatial smoothing is introduced. With this algorithm it possible to estimate signals with similar frequencies, when the elevation is 90 degrees. Simulations demonstrate that when two signals are coherent and a spatial smoothing factor of two is applied the mean of the azimuth estimation is the true mean. It is also demonstrated that when two signals have the same DOA a temporal smoothing factor of two is necessary and that more temporal smoothing reduces the standard deviation of the azimuth estimation. It is shown that the phase-mode excitation technique introduces a systematic error that is considerably high for few antenna elements and an even number of elements. It is demonstrated that interpolation can reduce this error in case a UCA of 5 elements or a UCA of 12 elements.


PhD Thesis Defence

Human Target Tracking in Multistatic Ultra-Wideband Radar


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MS3 seminar

Sparsity-based geometry optimization of the multisite radar networks

Inna Ivashko

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EUCAP14 conference on antennas and propagation

Abstract submission: 13 Oct 2013

Conference dates: 6-8 April 2014

Application areas:

  • Fundamental research
  • Satcom on-the-move terminal antennas
  • Navigation, localisation, positioning and tracking
  • Cellular mobile communications (includes: base station, handheld devices)
  • Machine to machine, internet on devices
  • Wireless networks (includes: WLAN, indoor communication)
  • High data-rate transfer and backbone networks
  • RFID and sensor networks
  • Biomedical (includes: human body interaction, on-body antennas, electromagnetic exposure and interactions)
  • Satellite communications
  • Satellite passive and active remote sensing
  • RADAR
  • Radio astronomy
  • Signal and image processing
  • Defense and security
  • Short-range Giga-bit communications
  • Commercial software

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MS3 seminar

Wideband Electric-Magnetic Antenna for Polarimetric Applications

Nadia Haider

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MS3 seminar

Efficient Sequential-Hierarchical Deployment Strategy for Heterogeneous Sensor Networks

Teun de Groot

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MSc TC Thesis Presentation

Compressive power spectral density estimation with non-uniform sampling

Fernando de la Hucha Arce


MSc TC Thesis Presentation

Photo-acoustic imaging

Victor Sloev

A new non-invasive imaging modality is based on transmitting a laser pulse on the skin; the created heat will cause an acoustic pulse that is detected with an ultrasonic array. How can an image be formed?